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Let's call a memory a memory, but what kind?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 December 2019

Nazim Keven*
Affiliation:
Department of Philosophy, Bilkent University, Cankaya/Ankara, Turkey06800. nazimkeven@bilkent.edu.trwww.sci-phi.com

Abstract

Hoerl & McCormack argue that animals cannot represent past situations and subsume animals’ memory-like representations within a model of the world. I suggest calling these memory-like representations as what they are without beating around the bush. I refer to them as event memories and explain how they are different from episodic memory and how they can guide action in animal cognition.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2019

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References

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Let's call a memory a memory, but what kind?
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