Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-kbvt8 Total loading time: 0.704 Render date: 2021-10-24T10:55:56.584Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Interrelationships of factors of social development are more complex than Life History Theory predicts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 November 2019

Boris Kotchoubey*
Affiliation:
Institute of Medical Psychology and Behavioral Neurobiology, University of Tübingen, 72076 Tübingen, Germany. boris.kotchoubey@uni-tuebingen.dehttps://www.medizin.unituebingen.de/de/Presse_Aktuell/Einrichtungen+A+bis+Z/Institute/Medizinische+Psychologie/Mitarbeiter/Prof_+Dr_+Boris+Kotchoubey-p-150765.html

Abstract

Life History Theory (LHT) predicts a monotonous relationship between affluence and the rate of innovations and strong correlations within a cluster of behavioral features. Although both predictions can be true in specific cases, they are incorrect in general. Therefore, the author's explanations may be right, but they do not prove LHT and cannot be generalized to other apparently similar processes.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2019 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Adler, N. J. (1997) International dimensions of organizational behavior, 3rd edition. Southwestern.Google Scholar
Dakhli, M. & De Clercq, D. (2003) Human capital, social capital and innovation: A multi-country study. Working Paper, Univeristeit Gent. Available at: http://doi/10.1.1.197.4146.pdf.Google Scholar
Diener, E., Sadndvik, E., Seidlitz, L. & Diener, M. (1993) The relationship between income and subjective well-being: Relative or absolute? Social Indicators Research 28:195223.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A. & Rose, M. (1987) Alternative ethics: The relationship between the wealth, welfare, work, and leisure ethic. Human Relations 40(9):561–74.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Halpern, D. (2001) Moral values, social trust and equality. British Journal of Criminology 41:236–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Huang, W. S. W. (1995) A cross-national analysis on the effect of moral individualism on murder rates. International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology 39:6375.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Popper, K. (1963) Conjectures and refutations. Routledge and Keagan Paul.Google Scholar
Tang, L. & Koveos, P. E. (2004) Venture entrepreneurship, innovation entrepreneurship, and economic growth. Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship 9:161–71.Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Interrelationships of factors of social development are more complex than Life History Theory predicts
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Interrelationships of factors of social development are more complex than Life History Theory predicts
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Interrelationships of factors of social development are more complex than Life History Theory predicts
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *