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Individual-level psychology and group-level traits

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 June 2014

Michael Muthukrishna
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada. michael@psych.ubc.ca schaller@psych.ubc.ca http://www2.psych.ubc.ca/~schaller/schaller.htm
Mark Schaller
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada. michael@psych.ubc.ca schaller@psych.ubc.ca http://www2.psych.ubc.ca/~schaller/schaller.htm

Abstract

Psychological research on social influence illuminates many mechanisms through which role differentiation and collaborative interdependence may affect cultural evolution. We focus here on psychological processes that produce specific patterns of asymmetric influence, which in turn can have predictable consequences for the emergence and transmission of group-level traits.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

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