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Implications for technological reserve development in advancing age, cognitive impairment, and dementia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 August 2020

Jared F. Benge
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology and Plummer Movement Disorders Center, Baylor Scott and White Health, Texas A&M College of Medicine, Temple, TX76508Jared.Benge@BSWHealth.org
Michael K. Scullin
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Baylor University, Waco, TX76798.Michael_Scullin@Baylor.edusites.baylor.edu/scullin

Abstract

This commentary draws connections between technological culture emergence and recent trends in using assistive technology to reduce the burden of Alzheimer's disease. By the technical-reasoning hypothesis, cognitively-impaired individuals will lack the cognitive ability to employ technologies. By the technological reserve hypothesis, social-motivational and cultural transmissibility factors can provide foundations for using technology as cognitive prosthetics even during neurodegenerative illnesses.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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