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Ecologically structured information: The power of pictures and other effective data presentations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 October 2007

Wolfgang Gaissmaier
Affiliation:
Center for Adaptive Behavior and Cognition, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Lentzeallee 94, 14195 Berlin, Germanygaissmaier@mpib-berlin.mpg.dewww.abc.mpib-berlin.mpg.de/users/gaissmaierstraubinger@mpib-berlin.mpg.dewww.abc.mpib-berlin.mpg.de./users/straubinger
Nils Straubinger
Affiliation:
Center for Adaptive Behavior and Cognition, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Lentzeallee 94, 14195 Berlin, Germanygaissmaier@mpib-berlin.mpg.dewww.abc.mpib-berlin.mpg.de/users/gaissmaierstraubinger@mpib-berlin.mpg.dewww.abc.mpib-berlin.mpg.de./users/straubinger
David C. Funder
Affiliation:
Center for Adaptive Behavior and Cognition, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Lentzeallee 94, 14195 Berlin, Germanygaissmaier@mpib-berlin.mpg.dewww.abc.mpib-berlin.mpg.de/users/gaissmaierstraubinger@mpib-berlin.mpg.dewww.abc.mpib-berlin.mpg.de./users/straubinger Department of Psychology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521. funder@ucr.eduwwww.rap.ucr.edu

Abstract

The general principle behind the effects of nested sets on the use of base rates, we believe, is that the mind is prepared to take in “ecologically structured information.” Without any need to assume two cognitive systems, this principle explains how the proper use of base rates can be facilitated and also accounts for occasions when base rates are overused.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2007

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