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Doing with development: Moving toward a complete theory of concepts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 June 2010

Haley A. Vlach
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563. haleyvlach@ucla.edu laurenkrogh@gmail.com emilyt0623@ucla.edu sandhof@psych.ucla.edu
Lauren Krogh
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563. haleyvlach@ucla.edu laurenkrogh@gmail.com emilyt0623@ucla.edu sandhof@psych.ucla.edu
Emily E. Thom
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563. haleyvlach@ucla.edu laurenkrogh@gmail.com emilyt0623@ucla.edu sandhof@psych.ucla.edu
Catherine M. Sandhofer
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563. haleyvlach@ucla.edu laurenkrogh@gmail.com emilyt0623@ucla.edu sandhof@psych.ucla.edu

Abstract

Machery proposes that the construct of “concept” detracts from research progress. However, ignoring development also detracts from research progress. Developmental research has advanced our understanding of how concepts are acquired and thus is essential to a complete theory. We propose a framework that both accounts for development and holds great promise as a new direction for thinking about concepts.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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