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Divergent life histories and other ecological adaptations: Examples of social-class differences in attention, cognition, and attunement to others

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 November 2017

Igor Grossmann
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada. igrossma@uwaterloo.ca https://uwaterloo.ca/wisdom-and-culture-lab/
Michael E. W. Varnum
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1104. mvarnum@asu.edu https://sites.google.com/site/mewvarnum/

Abstract

Many behavioral and psychological effects of socioeconomic status (SES), beyond those presented by Pepper & Nettle cannot be adequately explained by life-history theory. We review such effects and reflect on the corresponding ecological affordances and constraints of low- versus high-SES environments, suggesting that several ecology-specific adaptations, apart from life-history strategies, are responsible for the behavioral and psychological effects of SES.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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