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(Dis)advantages of student subjects: What is your research question?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 June 2010

Simon Gächter
Affiliation:
School of Economics, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, United Kingdom. simon.gaechter@nottingham.ac.uk http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/Economics/people/simon.gaechter
Corresponding

Abstract

I argue that the right choice of subject pool is intimately linked to the research question. At least within economics, students are often the perfect subject pool for answering some fundamental research questions. Student subject pools can provide an invaluable benchmark for investigating generalizability across different social groups or cultures.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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(Dis)advantages of student subjects: What is your research question?
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