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A cross-species perspective on the selfishness axiom

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 December 2005

Sarah F. Brosnan
Affiliation:
Department of Anthropology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322 http://userwww.service.emory.edu/~sbrosna Living Links, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Atlanta, GA 30329 http://www.emory.edu/LIVING_LINKS
Frans B. M. de Waal
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322 Living Links, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Atlanta, GA 30329 http://www.emory.edu/LIVING_LINKS
Corresponding

Abstract

Henrich et al. describe an innovative research program investigating cross-cultural differences in the selfishness axiom (in economic games) in humans, yet humans are not the only species to show such variation. Chimpanzees and capuchin monkeys show signs of deviating from the standard self-interest paradigm in experimental settings by refusing to take foods that are less valuable than those earned by conspecifics, indicating that they, too, may pay attention to relative gains. However, it is less clear whether these species also show the other-regarding preferences seen in humans.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2005

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