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Creative mathematics: Do SAT-M sex effects matter?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 February 2010

Diana Eugenie Kornbrot
Affiliation:
Psychology Division, The Hatfield Polytechnic, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL 10 9AB, United Kingdom

Abstract

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Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1988

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