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Brain-behavioral studies: The importance of detailed observations of behavior

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 February 2010

C. H. Vanderwolf
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 5C2

Abstract

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Type
Continuing Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1983

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References

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