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Brain networks for emotion and cognition: Implications and tools for understanding mental disorders and pathophysiology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 March 2019

Luiz Pessoa
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology and Maryland Neuroimaging Center, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742. pessoa@umd.eduhttp://www.lce.umd.edu/
Corresponding
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Abstract

Understanding how structure maps to function in the brain in terms of large-scale networks is critical to elucidating the brain basis of mental phenomena and mental disorders. Given that this mapping is many-to-many, I argue that researchers need to shift to a multivariate brain and behavior characterization to fully unravel the contributions of brain processes to typical and atypical function.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2019 

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