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Beyond neonatal imitation: Aerodigestive stereotypies, speech development, and social interaction in the extended perinatal period

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 December 2017

Nazim Keven
Affiliation:
Department of Philosophy, Bilkent University, TR-06800 Bilkent, Ankara, Turkey. nazimkeven@bilkent.edu.tr http://sci-phi.com/
Kathleen A. Akins
Affiliation:
Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada. kathleea@sfu.ca http://www.sfu.ca/~kathleea/

Abstract

In our target article, we argued that the positive results of neonatal imitation are likely to be by-products of normal aerodigestive development. Our hypothesis elicited various responses on the role of social interaction in infancy, the methodological issues about imitation experiments, and the relation between the aerodigestive theory and the development of speech. Here we respond to the commentaries.

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Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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