Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-8bbf57454-kwtxg Total loading time: 0.819 Render date: 2022-01-25T21:22:03.429Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Beyond market behavior: Evolved cognition and folk political economic beliefs

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 August 2018

Talbot M. Andrews
Affiliation:
Department of Political Science, Stony Brook University, Center for Behavioral Political Economy, Stony Brook, NY 11794. talbot.andrews@stonybrook.eduandrew.delton@stonybrook.eduhttps://you.stonybrook.edu/talbotmandrews/www.andrewdelton.com
Andrew W. Delton
Affiliation:
Department of Political Science, Stony Brook University, Center for Behavioral Political Economy, Stony Brook, NY 11794. talbot.andrews@stonybrook.eduandrew.delton@stonybrook.eduhttps://you.stonybrook.edu/talbotmandrews/www.andrewdelton.com

Abstract

Boyer & Petersen (B&P) lay out a compelling theory for folk-economic beliefs, focusing on beliefs about markets. However, societies also allocate resources through mechanisms involving power and group decision-making (e.g., voting), through the political economy. We encourage future work to keep folk political economic beliefs in mind, and sketch an example involving pollution and climate change mitigation policy.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2018 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Boehm, C. (2009) Hierarchy in the forest: The evolution of egalitarian behavior. Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Fiske, A. P. (1992) The four elementary forms of sociality: Framework for a unified theory of social relations. Psychological Review 99(4):689723. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1037/0033-295X.99.4.689.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Franciosi, R., Isaac, R. M., Pingry, D. E. & Reynolds, S. S. (1993) An experimental investigation of the Hahn-Noll revenue neutral auction for emissions licenses. Journal of Environmental Economics and Management 24:124.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goeree, J. K., Palmer, K., Holt, C. A., Shobe, W. & Burtraw, D. (2010) An experimental study of auctions versus grandfathering to assign pollution permits. Journal of the European Economic Association 8(2–3):514–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kuklinski, J. H. & Quirk, P. J. (2000) Reconsidering the rational public: Cognition, heuristics, and mass opinion. In: Elements of reason: Cognition, choice, and the bounds of rationality, ed. Lupia, A., McCubbins, M. D. & Popkin, S. L., pp. 951–71. Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Ledyard, J. O. & Szakaly-Moore, K. (1994) Designing organizations for trading pollution rights. Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization 25(2):167–96. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/0167-2681(94)90009-4.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Miller, G. & Hammond, T. (1994) Why politics is more fundamental than economics. Journal of Theoretical Politics 6(1):526. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1177/0951692894006001001.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mueller, D. C. (2003) Public Choice III. Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Noll, R. G. (1982) Implementing marketable emissions permits. The American Economic Review 72(2):120–24.Google Scholar
Petersen, M. B. (2013) Moralization as protection against exploitation: Do individuals without allies moralize more? Evolution and Human Behavior 34(2):7885. doi: 10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2012.09.006.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Riggio, H. R. & Riggio, R. E. (2010) Appearance-based trait inferences and voting: Evolutionary roots and implications for leadership. Journal of Nonverbal Behavior 34(2):119–25. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10919-009-0083-0.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smith, T. W., Marsden, P., Hout, M. & Kim, J. (2016) General Social Surveys, 1972–2016. NORC (National Opinion Research Center) at the University of Chicago. Available at: gssdataexplorer.norc.org.Google Scholar
Van Vugt, M., Hogan, R. & Kaiser, R. B. (2008) Leadership, followership, and evolution: Some lessons from the past. American Psychologist 63(3):182–96. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1037/0003-066X.63.3.182.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Beyond market behavior: Evolved cognition and folk political economic beliefs
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Beyond market behavior: Evolved cognition and folk political economic beliefs
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Beyond market behavior: Evolved cognition and folk political economic beliefs
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *