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Attention and memory-driven effects in action studies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 January 2017

Philip Tseng
Affiliation:
Institute of Humanities in Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei City 11031, Taiwan. philip@tmu.edu.twhttp://medhuman1.tmu.edu.tw/philip/ Brain & Consciousness Research Center, Shuang-Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City 23561, Taiwan. timlane@tmu.edu.twhttp://chss.tmu.edu.tw/intro/super_pages.php?ID=intro3
Timothy Lane
Affiliation:
Institute of Humanities in Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei City 11031, Taiwan. philip@tmu.edu.twhttp://medhuman1.tmu.edu.tw/philip/ Brain & Consciousness Research Center, Shuang-Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City 23561, Taiwan. timlane@tmu.edu.twhttp://chss.tmu.edu.tw/intro/super_pages.php?ID=intro3 Institute of European and American Studies, Academia Sinica, Taipei City 11529, Taiwan Research Center for Mind, Brain, and Learning, National Chengchi University, Taipei City 11605, Taiwan
Bruce Bridgeman
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064. bruceb@ucsc.eduhttp://people.ucsc.edu/~bruceb/

Abstract

We provide empirical examples to conceptually clarify some items on Firestone & Scholl's (F&S's) checklist, and to explain perceptual effects from an attentional and memory perspective. We also note that action and embodied cognition studies seem to be most susceptible to misattributing attentional and memory effects as perceptual, and identify four characteristics unique to action studies and possibly responsible for misattributions.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

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