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Are beliefs the proper targets of adaptationist analyses?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 January 2010

James R. Liddle
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Florida Atlantic University, Davie, FL 33314. jliddle1@fau.eduhttp://www.jamesrliddle.comtshackel@fau.eduhttp://www.toddkshackelford.com
Todd K. Shackelford
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Florida Atlantic University, Davie, FL 33314. jliddle1@fau.eduhttp://www.jamesrliddle.comtshackel@fau.eduhttp://www.toddkshackelford.com

Abstract

McKay & Dennett's (M&D's) description of beliefs, and misbeliefs in particular, is a commendable contribution to the literature; but we argue that referring to beliefs as adaptive or maladaptive can cause conceptual confusion. “Adaptive” is inconsistently defined in the article, which adds to confusion and renders it difficult to evaluate the claims, particularly the possibility of “adaptive misbelief.”

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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Are beliefs the proper targets of adaptationist analyses?
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