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Applying the bicoded spatial model to nonhuman primates in an arboreal multilayer environment

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 October 2013

Allison M. Howard
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602–3013. allisonmariehoward@gmail.com doree@uga.edu http://psychology.uga.edu/primate/
Dorothy M. Fragaszy
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602–3013. allisonmariehoward@gmail.com doree@uga.edu http://psychology.uga.edu/primate/

Abstract

Applying the framework proposed by Jeffery et al. to nonhuman primates moving in multilayer arboreal and terrestrial environments, we see that these animals must generate a mosaic of many bicoded spaces in order to move efficiently and safely through their habitat. Terrestrial light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology and three-dimensional modelling of canopy movement may permit testing of Jeffery et al.'s framework in natural environments.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013 

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