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Supported Employment for Adults with High Functioning Autism and Asperger's Syndrome

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 February 2012

Ruth Anne Rehfeldt*
Affiliation:
Southern Illinois University, United States

Abstract

The prevalence of autism spectrum disorders is currently on the rise nationwide. Approximately one fifth of all individuals with autism and related disorders function within the normal range of intelligence, and may, in fact, possess superior intelligence in certain areas. Despite this, many individuals with high functioning autism and Asperger's syndrome are not competitively employed. The challenges that such individuals experience in securing and maintaining employment are often just as severe as those for individuals with more limited intellectual functioning. Characteristics of high functioning autism and Asperger's syndrome are described, and recommendations for how rehabilitation counsellors and other professionals can best support the employment pursuits of individuals with the disorders are provided.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2003

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