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Pressure to Progress: Severe Traumatic Brain Injury and Slow Recovery in the Current Health Care Environment

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 February 2017

Michele Foster
Affiliation:
The University of Queensland, Australia
Cheryl Tilse
Affiliation:
The University of Queensland, Australia
Jennifer Fleming
Affiliation:
The University of Queensland, Australia
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Abstract

This paper discusses issues arising from a study of referral from acute care following traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Queensland, in which aged care facilities were relied upon for the discharge of those with slow recovery after severe TBI. The discussion considers: (1) recovery following severe TBI; (2) the current policy context; (3) approaches to care beyond acute care; and (4) implications for policy and practice. In the current health care environment, with increasing pressure on scarce resources, it is critical that practitioners advocate for the dignity and care of people who sustain severe TBI and who are slow to recover.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2002

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