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Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Combat and the Vietnam Veteran

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 February 2012

Stephen Redwood
Affiliation:
Massey University, New Zealand
Fiona Alpass
Affiliation:
Massey University, New Zealand
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The impact of stress on both the psychological and physical wellbeing of the individual has been a primary topic in the psychological literature over the past decade. Alongside the weight of research on the effects of life stressors, the study of traumatic stress and its physical and psychological sequelae has overwhelmingly captivated researchers across the full range of the social science disciplines. Recent events have focused attention on the plight of combat veterans once again. The current review was undertaken in order to provide an overview of the recent extensive research activity on PTSD in war and combat veterans and focuses predominantly on veterans from the Vietnam War. Epidemiological data is presented on the prevalence of traumatic stress and the incidence of PTSD. Evidence for the high rates of co-morbidity between PTSD and other major clinical disorders is reviewed and the contribution of a number of peri-traumatic variables, pre-trauma and post-trauma factors to the development of PTSD is assessed. A review of the cognitive theories of PTSD suggests a number of common elements and theoretical similarities.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2005

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