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Motivation and Readiness for Physical Activity and Exercise Behaviour among People with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: A Brief Report

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 July 2018

Jessica M. Brooks*
Affiliation:
University of North Texas and Dartmouth College
Kelly Costigan
Affiliation:
Chrysalis Inc.
Jia-Rung Wu
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Xiangli Chen
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Kevin Bengtson
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Fong Chan
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Kanako Iwanaga
Affiliation:
Northern Illinois University
Chungyi Chiu
Affiliation:
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
*
Address for correspondence: Jessica M. Brooks, Rehabilitation and Health Services, University of North Texas Chilton Hall 218-G, 410 Avenue C, Suite 218, Denton, TX 76203USA. E-mail: Jessica.Brooks@unt.edu

Abstract

The main objective of this study was to investigate the relationships between motivation and readiness levels for physical activity and exercise behaviour among persons with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Participants were 211 U.S. adults with chronic musculoskeletal pain from online support groups as well as specialty and primary care clinics (females = 86.7%; mean age = 43.4 years, SD = 14.4 years). The participants completed an online survey on their engagement in physical activity and exercise behaviour. Multiple one-way analyses of variance with post-hoc comparisons using the Tukey HSD test revealed significant differences between the readiness stages of change groups of preintenders, intenders, and actors in their motivation for physical activity and exercise behaviour. Specifically, the actor group of behavioural change reported higher levels of motivation beliefs for physical activity and exercise behaviour compared to preintenders and intenders. These findings suggest that people with chronic musculoskeletal pain experiencing increased motivation for physical activity and exercise behaviour are more engaged in desired behaviours than the persons with chronic pain reporting varying degrees of behavioural intentions.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) 2018 

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