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Walk-In Counselling Services: Making the Most of One Hour

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2012

Arnold Slive*
Affiliation:
Clinical and Consulting Psychologist, 11603 Ladera Vista #27, Austin TXUSA, 78759
Monte Bobele
Affiliation:
Psychology Department, Our Lady of the Lake University, San Antonio, Texas
*
Address for correspondence: 11603 Ladera Vista #27, Austin, Texas, USA. Email: arnie@slive.ca
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Abstract

This article describes walk-in single session counselling, a form of service delivery that enables clients to receive one session of counselling without the usual hurdles of intake and wait times. We distinguish between walk-in counselling and single session therapy by appointment. We describe a mindset for therapists that supports walk-in work. We also describe the workings of a walk-in session using a transcript, with commentary, of an actual session. Benefits and possible applications of the walk-in counselling concept are discussed.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2012

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