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Single-Session Approaches to Therapy: Time to Review

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2012

Alistair Campbell*
Affiliation:
Australian Institute of Psychology, Brisbane, Australia
*
Address for correspondence: Australian Institute of Psychology, Level 2, 140 Brunswick Street, Fortitude Valley QLD 4006. Email: alistair@aip.edu.au
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Abstract

In 2001 Bloom produced a comprehensive review of single-session approaches to therapy (SST). In his paper he outlined the concept of single session therapy and considered the evidence that could be used to support implementation of single session approaches. At the time, Bloom's was probably the most comprehensive review of research on single session therapy available: he considered papers that provided overviews of approaches to developing and delivering single-session treatment, as well as papers that used controlled and uncontrolled methods to evaluate outcomes. What I will do in this paper is to informally review the literature on single session therapy that has been published since Bloom's 2001 paper. The paper is not intended as a formal review or meta-analysis of research data, partly because the field still does not have such methodological rigour.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2012

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References

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