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Complex Couples: Multi-Theoretical Couples Counselling with Traumatised Adults Who have a History of Child Sexual Abuse

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 November 2012

Sheri Zala*
Affiliation:
Clinical Senior Counsellor, Sexual Assault Service, Northern NSW
*
Address for correspondence: sherizala@gmail.com
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Abstract

One of the major ways child sexual abuse can have an impact on individuals is in their later ability to have and maintain fulfilling couple relationships. Survivors may experience avoidance behaviours that become problematic in their adult intimate relationships. If couple therapists fail to focus on these traumatic imprints, the therapy may founder. This paper proposes that a multi-theoretical approach enables the couple therapist to deal with the complex problems such couples present including sexuality and intimacy concerns. Such an approach integrates trauma theory, attachment theory, feminist principles, body-oriented psychotherapy, and systemic couple therapy.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2012

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