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Using Online Video-Recorded Interviews to Connect the Theory and Practice of Inclusive Education in a Course for Student Teachers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 October 2013

Christopher Rayner*
Affiliation:
Faculty of Education, University of Tasmania, Australia
Jeanne Maree Allen
Affiliation:
Faculty of Education, University of Tasmania, Australia
*
Correspondence: Christopher Rayner, Faculty of Education, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 66, Hobart, Tas. 7001, Australia. E-mail: Christopher.Rayner@utas.edu.au

Abstract

This article reports on a study into university preservice teachers’ perceptions of online video-recorded interviews as an alternative to the traditional lecture format in a course on inclusive education. With the aim of assisting preservice teachers to link theory and practice, the series of video-recorded interviews focused on key concepts around educating students with diverse needs and abilities. The interviews were conducted between the course coordinator and a number of professionals with relevant field experience in special education and inclusion, and were then made available to preservice teachers online. Survey data indicated that this type of delivery model was perceived as effective in promoting engagement and learning, and in facilitating an understanding of the connection between theory and practice. Implications for teacher education are discussed.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2013 

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