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Concepts and material associations in the work of Gigon/Guyer

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 August 2008

Charles Rattray
Affiliation:
The Scott Sutherland School of ArchitectureRobert Gordon UniversityGarthdeeAberdeen AB107QBUnited Kingdom
Graeme Hutton
Affiliation:
The School of ArchitectureUniversity of DundeeFaculty of Duncan of JordanstoneDundee DD14HNUnited Kingdom

Extract

Zürich architects Annette Gigon and Mike Guyer display an enjoyment of the realities – both physical and intellectual – of architectural production and, to this extent, can be seen as part of a prevailing pattern in northern Switzerland. This paper comments on their work and shows it also to be creatively critical, subverting a number of modern orthodoxies and supplanting them with an affective internal logic.

Type
Design
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2000

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References

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