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New research on Aegean & Pontic transport amphorae of the ninth to first century BC, 2010–2020

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 December 2020

Mark L. Lawall
Affiliation:
University of Manitoba Mark.Lawall@umanitoba.ca
Chavdar Tzochev
Affiliation:
The British School at Athens c.tzochev@bsa.ac.uk
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Abstract

Research on transport amphorae in the Aegean and the Black Sea regions during the past decade has progressed significantly, both accumulating, synthesizing and interpreting new and old data, and increasing attention given to previously neglected areas and periods. Much work has been done on identifying places of production, defining typological development and refining chronologies. Greece and Turkey are achieving greater prominence in the field, as is attention to the Early Iron Age. Old debates – such as on the purposes and the meanings of amphora stamps – have been reignited with new ideas and the roles of transport amphorae in socio-economic systems continue to draw attention. Another emerging trend is the effort to consider amphorae in the longue durée. As material grows and the field becomes more cosmopolitan, amphora studies increasingly face the challenge of aggregating and synthesizing data in a way that can encourage participation in the broader dialogues of economic historians.

Type
Archaeology in Greece 2019–2020
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Society for the Promotion of Hellenic Studies and the British School at Athens

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