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XXIII.— A Palaeolithic Industry at Northfleet, Kent

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 November 2011

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The general recognition of man's existence in this country during the deposition of the terrace-gravels of our southern rivers may be said to date from a paper read to this Society by Sir John Evans in 1859; and it was in the same year that McEnery's papers relating to his labours in Kent's Cavern were published, demonstrating the former presence of palaeolithic cave-man on this side of the Channel. The transition from river-drift to cave-deposits, on the other hand, has only recently been illustrated by a close study of the brick-earth deposit on High Lodge Hill near Mildenhall, Suffolk; and the present paper is intended to amplify the evidence for a Moustier period in England, and to bring our deposits of that horizon into still closer relation with the French. If a relative date is incidentally provided for a deposit that has long been somewhat of a mystery to geologists, and if in their turn geologists are moved to do something more for archaeology, the advantage will be considerable. The success that has recently attended what may be called ‘intensive geology’ in connexion with pleistocene man will no doubt find an echo in this country, and our wealth of material has certainly been used with greater advantage in the last few years. The boulder-clays, which are denied to France, should enable workers in this field to straighten out the connexion of man with the glacial period.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Society of Antiquaries of London 1911

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References

page 515 note 1 Archaeologia, xxxviii. 280Google Scholar.

page 517 note 1 The Fossils of the South Downs; or Illustrations of the Geology of Sussex (1822), 277.Google Scholar

page 518 note 1 Dixon, Fred, Geology of Sussex, 2nd ed., 112Google Scholar.

page 519 note 1 Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, xliii. 364Google Scholar.

page 520 note 1 Teeth of this species were found by Mantell in the Coombe-rock at Brighton (Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, vii. 366Google Scholar).

page 522 note 1 Journal of Anthropological Institute, xiii. 109, pl. iii, fig. 5Google Scholar (side view of core, 5 in. wide), figs. 7, 8 (views of perfect implement, 4 in. long). A summary in Archaeologia Cantiana, xv. 102Google Scholar. The term ‘turtle-back’ is used for a certain class of implements in America; Moorehead, W. K., Stone Age in North America, i. 40, 191, 348Google Scholar.

page 523 note 1 Our Fellow Mr. Garraway Rice exhibited in illustration of this feature several flakes found in front of the Union Workhouse at Ospringe, on the west side of Faversham and about twenty-five miles from Northfleet. They may be contemporary, but the circumstances of the discovery are not known.

page 526 note 1 Smith, Worthington G., Man, the Primeval Savage, p. 122Google Scholar; Stone Age Guide (British Museum), 2nd ed., p 27.Google Scholar

page 527 note 1 Quart. Journ. Gool. Soc, xlii. 9Google Scholar, fig. 6 (Natural History Museum).

page 527 note 2 According to Dr. Allen Sturge, who also informs me that the supply of first-class flint at Brandon is now exhausted.

page 528 note 1 L'industrie Moustérienne dans la region du Nord de la France (5me Congrès préhistorique de France, Session de Beauvais (1909), 115).

page 531 note 1 Obermaier, , Die Steingeräte des französischen Altpaläolithikums (Vienna, 1908)Google Scholar, 74, figs. 117, 118, 122, 123 (separate impression, from Mitt, der prähist. Kommission der Kais. Akad. Der Wissenschaften, vol. ii).

page 531 note 2 Proceedings, xxii. 453Google Scholar.

page 531 note 3 Summary of Progress in 1902 (Geological Survey), 206.

page 531 note 4 Summary of Progress in 1902 (Geological Survey), 206.

page 531 note 5 De Mortillet, , Le Préhistorique, 3rd ed. (1900), 599Google Scholar.

page 531 note 6 Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, vii. 274Google Scholar; section of Brighton cliff, fig. 7, p. 365.

page 531 note 7 L'Homme préhistorique, 1904, 118.

page 532 note 1 Le Préhistorique, 599. Hand-axes of St. Acheul type have even occurred at Le Moustier (L'Homme préhistorique, 1904, 198, fig. 92, nos. 1, 2).

page 532 note 2 Some have evidently lain on one face more than the other, the deeper patination of the upper face just encroaching on the edge of the under face, where it was unprotected by contact with the ground.

page 532 note 3 That flints in the Coombe-rock had been long exposed to the atmosphere is noticed in Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, vii. 126Google Scholar; other formations, apparently contemporary, are also given in a table opposite p. 136.

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