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Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 August 2014

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This Special Issue of Applied Psycholinguistics raises not only several issues about the human brain's behavior as manifest in the processing of language, but it is also intended to elicit scientific dialogue.

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Editorial
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Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

This Special Issue of Applied Psycholinguistics raises not only several issues about the human brain's behavior as manifest in the processing of language, but it is also intended to elicit scientific dialogue.

The Keynote Article exposes readers to a range of ideas about the topic of neuroplasticity and language. In doing so, we believe it advances the thinking on a topic of interest to our readers.

The format of a Keynote Article with Commentaries is one that leads to the integration and discussion of existing work as well as to the development of new ideas through thoughtful commentary. Such a format is meant to reflect the very nature of scientific pursuit in which researchers weigh evidence, identify gaps, and engage in the earnest discussion about how to address those gaps. When the discussion of science becomes acrimonious debate, it often advances egos and points of view more than science.

The work in this issue is a testimony to the strength of a comprehensive review of many people's work and to the sense-making such a review and the commentaries on it can provide. We thank Drs. Titone and Baum for their thoughtful review and considered response to the many commentators who engaged in stimulating and constructive dialogue with the issues.

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