Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-8r4lv Total loading time: 0.321 Render date: 2021-07-29T10:35:30.257Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Editors’ Note

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 March 2021

Fatih Bayram
Affiliation:
UiT The Arctic University of Norway
Jorge González Alonso
Affiliation:
UiT The Arctic University of Norway
Dave Kush
Affiliation:
University of Toronto Scarborough / NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Terje Lohndal
Affiliation:
NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology / UiT The Arctic University of Norway
Jason Rothman
Affiliation:
UiT The Arctic University of Norway / Universidad Antonio de Nebrija
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Type
Special Issue Editorial Note
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

Over half of the world’s population is at least bilingual. The construct of bilingualism is dynamic and fluid, which is to say, not all bilingualism is the same. Consider the fact that the label “bilingual” itself encompasses a diverse array of types, from simultaneous child acquirers in bilingual societies, to late adult second-language learners in and outside of linguistic immersion, to minority (heritage) language speakers growing up in societal monolingualism and many more contexts. With the important differences that pertain to context, opportunities for engagement with the experiences of bilingualism that ultimately lead to linguistic, cognitive, neurological and social outcomes vary across a wide range of dimensions for bilingual types in general, specific groups and, of course, individuals. Indeed, research has shown that age of onset, duration of bilingualism, intensity and degree of usage (in real and apparent time), (shifts) in linguistic dominance (over time), exposure to/training in literacy, variation in input (quantity and quality), social networks for language use, sociopolitical contexts amongst other co-varying factors weigh differentially on how the processes of bilingualism unfold. In this light, recent years have witnessed major shifts away from traditional categorical treatments of bilingualism, seeking to unpack the determinants of the wide range of individual variation. This issue of Applied Psycholinguistics is dedicated to the fascinating, yet puzzling and challenging task of teasing out, quantifying, modelling and predicting those individual differences to systematically map experiences to outcomes. The papers collected herein are the keynote addresses and some selected talks from the workshop Capturing and Quantifying Individual Differences in Bilingualism, which gathered experts from the fields of linguistics, psychology and cognitive neuroscience in September 2019 at UiT The Arctic University of Norway in Tromsø. Together, they provide an impressive coverage of the bilingualism experience, from basic epistemology to detailed methodology and constitute an invaluable reference point and roadmap for anyone interested in what capturing and quantifying all things bilingualism as a continuum entails.

You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Editors’ Note
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Editors’ Note
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Editors’ Note
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *