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Relative clause sentence production using augmentative and alternative communicationsystems

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 March 2001

ANN SUTTON
Affiliation:
Université de Montréal
TANYA GALLAGHER
Affiliation:
University of Illinois
JILL MORFORD
Affiliation:
University of New Mexico
NAVID SHAHNAZ
Affiliation:
McGill University

Abstract

Complex syntactic structures may be difficult to recognize when produced using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems that do not contain grammatical markers. The present study investigated adult English speakers' production of Subject and Object relative clause sentences using a picture/symbol-based AAC system with speech output. Most participants avoided the potential ambiguity that resulted from the absence of grammatical markers. They followed spoken English word order when encoding Object relative clause sentences, but altered this order for Subject relative clause sentences. Most participants used constituent proximity to maintain the distinction between Subject and Object relative clause sentences. Results indicate the combined effects of underlying syntactic knowledge and pragmatic variables on the AAC constituent order patterns observed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2000 Cambridge University Press

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