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Maternal Talk About Disappearance Events

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 March 2016

Beverly A. Goldfield*
Affiliation:
Rhode Island College
*
Psychology Department, Rhode Island College, Mt. Pleasant Avenue, Providence, RI 02908

Abstract

This study examines maternal talk about events in which persons or objects are hidden, missing, or absent, and the relationship of maternal language to the child's acquisition of words for disappearance. Twelve mother-child pairs were videotaped in the home during play when the children were 12, 15, and 18 months of age. The mothers kept a diary of the children 's words. Maternal language was coded during four types of disappearance events: peekaboo, hidden object games, missing objects, and absent entities. Children who had acquired gone and similar terms experienced more disappearance events and heard more maternal talk about disappearance than children who had not acquired a word for disappearance.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995

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