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Fast mapping in late-talking toddlers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 October 2011

SUSAN ELLIS WEISMER*
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin–Madison
COURTNEY E. VENKER
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin–Madison
JULIA L. EVANS
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin–Madison
MAURA JONES MOYLE
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin–Madison
*
ADDRESS FOR CORRESPONDENCE Susan Ellis Weismer, Department of Communicative Disorders and Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 1500 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705. E-mail: ellisweismer@wisc.edu

Abstract

This study investigated fast mapping in late-talking (LT) toddlers and toddlers with normal language (NL) development matched on age, nonverbal cognition, and maternal education. The fast-mapping task included novel object labels and familiar words. The LT group scored significantly lower than the NL group on novel word comprehension and production, as well as familiar word production. For both groups, fast-mapping performance was associated with concurrent language ability and later language outcomes. A post hoc analysis of phonotactic probability (PP) and neighborhood density (ND) suggested that the majority of NL toddlers displayed optimal learning of the nonword with low PP/ND. The LT group did not display the same sensitivity to PP/ND characteristics as the NL group.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

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