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Khirigsuurs, ritual and mobility in the Bronze Age of Mongolia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 March 2015

Francis Allard
Affiliation:
Department of Anthropology, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, USA. (Email: allard@iup.edu)
Diimaajav Erdenebaatar
Affiliation:
Institute of History, Mongolian Academy of Sciences, Mongolia (Email: ediimaajav@yahoo.com)

Abstract

The khirigsuurs are large and complex ritual sites that are major features in the landscape of Bronze Age Mongolia and represent considerable investment. The authors present recently investigated examples of this important class of monument, describe their attributes and offer preliminary deductions of the kind of society they imply – and whether it was truly nomadic.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © Antiquity Publications Ltd. 2005

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