Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-mm7gn Total loading time: 0.304 Render date: 2022-08-08T18:16:52.291Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Article contents

A first ‘Wessex 1’ date from Wessex

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Stuart Needham
Affiliation:
Langton Fold, North Lane, South Harting, West Sussex, GU31 5NW, UK
Mike Parker Pearson
Affiliation:
Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield, Northgate House, West Street, Sheffield, S1 4ET, UK
Alan Tyler
Affiliation:
22 Albert Road North, Malvern, Worcestershire, WR14 2TP, UK
Mike Richards
Affiliation:
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany; Department of Archaeology, Durham University, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE, UK
Mandy Jay
Affiliation:
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany; Department of Archaeology, Durham University, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE, UK

Abstract

The furnished barrow burials of Wessex represent a maturation of the Beaker rite during the Early Bronze Age in Britain. Many of these burials were unearthed centuries ago, when archaeology was at its most eager and insouciant, but – happily for us – there were often a few careful recorders on hand. Thanks to their records, the modern scientists engaged in the Beaker People Project can still follow the trail back to a museum specimen and obtain high precision dates – as in the case of the ‘Wessex 1’ grave from West Overton in Wessex reported here.

Type
Research articles
Copyright
Copyright © Antiquity Publications Ltd 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Annable, F.K. & Simpson, D.D.A.. 1964. Guide catalogue of the Neolithic and Bronze Age collections in Devizes Museum. Devizes: Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Society.Google Scholar
Apsimon, A. 1954. Dagger graves in the ‘Wessex’ Bronze Age. London Institute of Archaeology, Annual Report 10: 3761.Google Scholar
Bateman, T. 1861. Ten years' diggings in Celtic & Saxon grave hills, in the counties of Derby, Stafford, and York, from 1848 to 1858. London: George Allen & Sons.Google Scholar
Brindley, A. 2007. The dating of food vessels and urns in Ireland (Bronze Age Studies 7). Galway: National University of Ireland, Department of Archaeology.Google Scholar
Bronk Ramsey, C. 2001. Development of the radiocarbon program OxCal. Radiocarbon 43(2A): 355363.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bronk Ramsey, C. 2005. OxCal Program v3.10. Oxford:Oxford Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit.Google Scholar
Brown, T.A., Nelson, D.E., Vogel, J.S. & Southon, J.R.. 1988. Improved collagen extraction by modified Longin method. Radiocarbon 30(2): 171177.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Burleigh, R., Hewson, A. & Meeks, N.. 1976. British Museum radiocarbon measurements VIII. Radiocarbon 18: 1642.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cleal, R. 2005. ‘The small compass of a grave’: Early Bronze Age burial in and around Avebury and the Marlborough Downs, in Brown, G., Field, D. & McOmish, D. (ed.) The Avebury landscape: aspects of the field archaeology of the Marlborough Downs: 115132. Oxford: Oxbow.Google Scholar
DAVIS, J.B. & Thurnam, J.. 1865. Crania Britannica. London: printed for the subscribers by Taylor & Francis.Google Scholar
Grinsell, L.V. 1957. Archaeological Gazetteer in Pugh, R.B. & Crittall, E. (ed.) A history of Wiltshire, Volume 1, Part 1: 21279. Oxford: Oxford University Press for the Institute of Historical Research.Google Scholar
Hoare, R.C. 1819. The ancient history of north Wiltshire. London: William Miller.Google Scholar
Jay, M., Pearson, M. Parker, Richards, M.P., Nehlich, O., Montgomery, J., Chamberlain, A. & Sheridan, A.. In press. The Beaker People Project: an interim report on the progress of the isotopic analysis of the organic skeletal material in Allen, M.J., Sheridan, A. and McOmish, D. (ed.) The British Chalcolithic: people, place and polity in the later 3rd millennium (Prehistoric Society Research Paper 4). Oxford: Oxbow.Google Scholar
Kinnes, I., Gibson, A., Ambers, J., Bowman, S., Leese, M. &Boast, R.. 1991. Radiocarbon dating and British Beakers: the British Museum programme. Scottish Archaeological Review 8: 3568.Google Scholar
Lanting, J.N., Aerts-Bijma, A.T. & Van Der Plicht, J.. 2001. Dating of cremated bones. Radiocarbon 43(2): 249254.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Larsson, M. & Pearson, M. Parker (ed.) 2007. From Stonehenge to the Baltic: living with cultural diversity in the third millennium BC (British Archaeological Reports International Series 1692). Oxford: Archaeopress.Google Scholar
Needham, S. 1988. Selective deposition in the British Early Bronze Age. World Archaeology 20: 229248.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Needham, S. 1996. Chronology and periodisation in the British Bronze Age, in Randsborg, K. (ed.) Absolute chronology: archaeological Europe 2500-500 BC(Acta Archaeologica 67): 121140. Copenhagen: Munksgaard.Google Scholar
Needham, S. 2000. Power pulses across a cultural divide: cosmologically driven exchange between Armorica and Wessex. Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 66: 151207.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Needham, S. & Woodward, A.. 2008. The Clandon Barrow finery: a synopsis of success in an Early Bronze Age world. Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 74: 152.Google Scholar
Needham, S.P., Lawson, A.J. & Green, H.S.. 1985. Early Bronze Age hoards (British Bronze Age Metalwork, Associated Finds Series A16). London: British Museum.Google Scholar
Piggott, S. 1938. The Early Bronze Age in Wessex. Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 4: 52106.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reimer, P.J.Baillie, M.G.L., Bard, E., Bayliss, A., Beck, J.W., Bertrand, C.J.H., Blackwell, P.G., Buck, C.E., Burr, G.S., Cutler, K.B., Damon, P.E., Edwards, R.L., Fairbanks, R.G., Friedrich, M., Guilderson, T.P., Hogg, A.G., Hughen, K.A., Kromer, B., Mccormac, G., Manning, S., Ramsey, C.B., Reimer, R.W., Remmele, S., Southon, J.R., Stuiver, M., Talamo, S., Taylor, F.W., Van Der Plicht, J. & Weyhenmeyer, C.E.. 2004. Intcal04 terrestrial radiocarbon age calibration, 0-26 cal kyr BP. Radiocarbon 46 (3): 10291058.Google Scholar
Rohl, B. & Needham, S.. 1998. The circulation of metal in the British Bronze Age: the application of lead isotope analysis (Occasional Paper 102). London: British Museum.Google Scholar
Sheridan, A. & Shortland, A.. 2004. ‘… beads which have given rise to so much dogmatism, controversy and rash speculation’: faience in Early Bronze Age Britain and Ireland, in Shepherd, I.A.G. & Barclay, G.J. (ed.) Scotland in ancient Europe: the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of Scotland in their European context: 263279. Edinburgh: Society of Antiquaries of Scotland.Google Scholar
Skinner, J. n.d. British Library Additional Manuscript: 33648.Google Scholar
Smith, M.A.(ed.) 1957. Bronze Age hoards and grave-groups from the N.E. Midlands (Inventaria Archaeologica GB.19-24; International Congress of Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sciences). London: Garraway.Google Scholar
Thurnam, J. 1860. Examination of barrows on the downs of North Wiltshire in 1853-57. Wiltshire Archaeological & Natural History Magazine 6:317336.Google Scholar
Vine, P.M. 1982. The Neolithic and Bronze Age cultures of the Middle and Upper Trent Basin (British Archaeological Reports, British Series 105). Oxford: British Archaeological Reports.Google Scholar
11
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

A first ‘Wessex 1’ date from Wessex
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

A first ‘Wessex 1’ date from Wessex
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

A first ‘Wessex 1’ date from Wessex
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *