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Article contents

Early multi-resource nomadism: Excavations at the Camel Site in the central Negev

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Steven A. Rosen*
Affiliation:
Archaeological Division, Ben-Gurion University, POB 653 Beersheva 84105 Israel

Extract

Excavations at the Camel Site, in the Negev, provide evidence of desert cottage industries making (and probably trading) beads and millstones in the Early Bronze Age. But these were people for whom nomadism was the ‘default lifestyle’.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © Antiquity Publications Ltd. 2003

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