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Bridging the Two Cultures – Commercial Archaeology and the Study of Prehistoric Britain

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 November 2008

Richard Bradley
Affiliation:
Department of Archaeology, School of Human and Environmental Sciences, University of Reading, Whiteknights, PO Box 217, Reading, Berkshire RG6 6AB, UK. E-mail: .
Corresponding
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Abstract

This paper was given at a meeting of the Society held on 12 January 2006 and it discusses the relationship between academic research and developer-funded archaeology in Britain today, highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of each. It considers the relationship between archaeological theory and practice and discusses the changing roles of academics, fieldworkers and managers. It argues that important issues need to be resolved, including the dissemination of information from recent archaeological fieldwork and the use of ‘grey literature’ in informing more ambitious interpretations of the past.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Society of Antiquaries of London 2006

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