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Indications of Holocene sea-level rise in Beaver Lake, East Antarctica

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2007

Bernd Wagner
Affiliation:
Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research, Seestrasse 15, D-18119 Warnemünde, Germany current address: Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne, Zülpicher Strasse 49a, D-50674 Köln, Germany
Nadja Hultzsch
Affiliation:
Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Research Unit Potsdam, Telegrafenberg A43, D-14473 Potsdam, Germany
Martin Melles
Affiliation:
University of Leipzig, Institute for Geophysics and Geology, Talstrasse 35, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany current address: Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne, Zülpicher Strasse 49a, D-50674 Köln, Germany
Damian B. Gore
Affiliation:
Department of Physical Geography, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia

Abstract

A 100 cm long sediment sequence was recovered from Beaver Lake in Amery Oasis, East Antarctica, using gravity and piston corers. Sedimentological and mineralogical analyses and the absence of micro and macrofossils indicate that the sediments at the base of the sequence formed under glacial conditions, probably prior to c. 12 500 cal. yr BP. The sediments between c. 81 and 31 cm depth probably formed under subaerial conditions, indicating that isostatic uplift since deglaciation has been substantially less than eustatic sea-level rise and that large areas of the present-day floor of Beaver Lake must have been subaerially exposed following deglaciation. The upper 31 cm of the sediment sequence were deposited under glaciomarine conditions similar to those of today, supporting geomorphic observations that the Holocene was a period of relative sea-level highstand in Amery Oasis.

Type
Earth Sciences
Copyright
Antarctic Science Ltd 2007

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