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Dickdellia on Colossendeis: testing ectoparasitism with stable isotopes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 March 2020

Roland R. Melzer
Affiliation:
Zoologische Staatssammlung München, Münchhausenstraße 21, 81247 Munich, Germany Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Department Biologie II, Großhaderner Straße 2, 82152 Planegg-Martinsried, Munich, Germany GeoBioCenterLMU, Richard-Wagner-Str. 10, 80333 Munich, Germany
Tobias Lehmann
Affiliation:
Zoologische Staatssammlung München, Münchhausenstraße 21, 81247 Munich, Germany
Christoph Mayr
Affiliation:
GeoBioCenterLMU, Richard-Wagner-Str. 10, 80333 Munich, Germany Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Institute of Geography, Wetterkreuz 15, 91058 Erlangen, Germany Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Richard-Wagner-Str. 10, 80333 Munich, Germany
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Extract

Many pycnogonids are ectoparasites of benthic invertebrates. Even gastropods are on their menu (reviewed in Dietz et al. 2018). It is somewhat ironic that a marine gastropod, Dickdellia labioflecta (Dell, 1990), might have reversed this principle. Hedgpeth (1964), Sirenko (2000) and Schiaparelli et al. (2008) observed clutches of eggs and young Dickdellia snails on pycnogonids. Sirenko (2000) suggested that this might be a case of ectoparasitism and not just phoresy.

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Short Note
Copyright
Copyright © Antarctic Science Ltd 2020

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References

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