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Bromoform concentrations in slush-layer water in Antarctic fast ice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 June 2011

Daiki Nomura*
Affiliation:
National Institute of Polar Research, 10-3 Midori-cho, Tachikawa, Tokyo 190-8501, Japan Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 6 Ichiban-cho, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-8471, Japan
Atsushi Ooki
Affiliation:
National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2, Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0053, Japan
Daisuke Simizu
Affiliation:
Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Kita-19, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0819, Japan
Mitsuo Fukuchi
Affiliation:
National Institute of Polar Research, 10-3 Midori-cho, Tachikawa, Tokyo 190-8501, Japan

Abstract

Bromoform concentrations in water of the slush layer that developed at the interface between snow and sea ice were measured during the seasonal warming in Lützow-Holm Bay, East Antarctica. Mean bromoform concentration was 5.5 ± 2.4 pmol l-1, which was lower than that of the under-ice water (10.9 ± 3.5 pmol l-1). Temporal decrease in bromoform concentrations and salinity with increasing temperature of the slush water suggest that the bromoform concentrations were reduced through dilution with meltwater input from the upper surface of sea ice. In contrast, bromoform concentrations in the under-ice water increased during this period while the salinity of the under-ice water decreased. It is speculated that the sea ice meltwater input contained high bromoform concentrations from the brine channels within the sea ice and from the bottom of the ice that were contributed to the increased bromoform concentrations in the under-ice water.

Type
Physical Sciences
Copyright
Copyright © Antarctic Science Ltd 2011

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Footnotes

Present address: Norwegian Polar Institute, The Polar Environmental Centre, Tromsø 9296, Norway

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