Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-rbzxz Total loading time: 0.389 Render date: 2022-05-27T19:09:17.952Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Article contents

Accounting for local scale variability in benthos: implications for future assessments of latitudinal trends in the coastal Ross Sea

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 November 2006

Vonda Cummings
Affiliation:
National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, PO Box 14-901, Wellington, New Zealand
Simon Thrush
Affiliation:
National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, PO Box 11-115, Hamilton, New Zealand
Alf Norkko
Affiliation:
National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, PO Box 11-115, Hamilton, New Zealand present address: Finnish Institute of Marine Research, PO Box 33, FIN-00931 Helsinki, Finland
Neil Andrew
Affiliation:
National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, PO Box 14-901, Wellington, New Zealand present address: WorldFish Center, PO Box 500, GPO, Penang, Malaysia
Judi Hewitt
Affiliation:
National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, PO Box 11-115, Hamilton, New Zealand
Greig Funnell
Affiliation:
National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, PO Box 11-115, Hamilton, New Zealand
Anne-Maree Schwarz
Affiliation:
National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, PO Box 11-115, Hamilton, New Zealand present address:WorldFish Center, PO Box 77, Gizo, Solomon Islands

Abstract

This paper is a contribution to the Latitudinal Gradient Project. It describes macro and epifaunal assemblages and habitats at three shallow water locations at the southern end of the western Ross Sea coast, and investigates relationships between faunal composition and environmental characteristics. Many variables (e.g. substrate type, sediment composition, depth, latitude, longitude) contributed to explaining the differences in community composition between locations, with latitude (a likely surrogate for broader scale factors, e.g. ice cover) one of the most important. The percentage explained by environmental characteristics was strongly scale dependent, decreasing with increasing scale of observation. As much as 66% and 75% of the variability in macrofaunal and epifaunal assemblages, respectively, was explained at the smallest scale (i.e. between transects within a location), compared to 9–18% and 11–32%, respectively, at the scale of the entire study. This relationship was also true for species richness and total abundance. This suggests that while small-scale habitat variability will not confound our ability to detect latitudinal gradients in future studies, adequately quantifying the environmental factors important in structuring these communities at larger (latitudinal) spatial scales will be important. Finally, large differences in habitat structure did not translate into large differences in the diversity of fauna, illustrating the difficulty of predicting faunal composition in the Ross Sea based on seafloor topography alone.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Antarctic Science Ltd 2006

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
45
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Accounting for local scale variability in benthos: implications for future assessments of latitudinal trends in the coastal Ross Sea
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Accounting for local scale variability in benthos: implications for future assessments of latitudinal trends in the coastal Ross Sea
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Accounting for local scale variability in benthos: implications for future assessments of latitudinal trends in the coastal Ross Sea
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *