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Bilingualism as a Resource in the United States

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 November 2008

Extract

This paper specifies characteristics of language as a resource and demonstrates that it is possible from the perspective of economics to make a case for government involvement in foreign language learning and maintenance of skills in the U.S.A. Market solutions based on private incentives to learn and maintain language skills alone fail to provide nationally optimal solutions to international communication needs. What is required is an alternative system which combines market with non-market incentives to foreign language learning and use.

Type
Introductory Essays
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1985

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