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Probiotics in milk replacer influence lamb immune function and meat quality

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 September 2011

A. Santillo
Affiliation:
Department of Production Sciences and Innovation in Mediterranean Agriculture and Food Systems (PrIME), University of Foggia, Via Napoli, 25, 71100 Foggia, Italy
G. Annicchiarico
Affiliation:
Agricultural and Research Council (CRA-ZOE), Via Napoli, 71020 Segezia-Foggia, Italy
M. Caroprese
Affiliation:
Department of Production Sciences and Innovation in Mediterranean Agriculture and Food Systems (PrIME), University of Foggia, Via Napoli, 25, 71100 Foggia, Italy
R. Marino
Affiliation:
Department of Production Sciences and Innovation in Mediterranean Agriculture and Food Systems (PrIME), University of Foggia, Via Napoli, 25, 71100 Foggia, Italy
A. Sevi
Affiliation:
Department of Production Sciences and Innovation in Mediterranean Agriculture and Food Systems (PrIME), University of Foggia, Via Napoli, 25, 71100 Foggia, Italy
M. Albenzio
Affiliation:
Department of Production Sciences and Innovation in Mediterranean Agriculture and Food Systems (PrIME), University of Foggia, Via Napoli, 25, 71100 Foggia, Italy
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Abstract

This study was undertaken to assess the effect of milk replacer (MR) containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and a mix of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum on lamb immune response and on lamb meat quality. A 6-week-trial was conducted on 40 male Comisana lambs, divided into four groups, fed maternal milk (MM), MR, MR with L. acidophilus supplementation (MRL) and MR with a mix (1 : 1) of B. animalis subsp. lactis and B. longum subsp. longum supplementations (MRB). Lambs fed MR containing a mix of bifidobacteria showed the highest in vivo cellular immune response to phytohemagglutinin, whereas MM and MRB showed the highest antibody response to ovalbumin. At day 11 of the trial, MRL displayed the highest value of Interleukin-10; differences disappeared among groups subsequently. Blood cholesterol levels in lambs fed MR containing L. acidophilus was almost halved compared with that found in MM and MR groups. Meat from artificially reared lambs was characterized by trans-11 18:1 and total conjugated 18:2n-6, whereas meat from the dam-suckled lambs was characterized by 14:0, cis-9 14:1 and 16:0. Polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acid ratio was higher in meat of MR, MRL and MRB than in MM lambs. Meat from artificially reared lamb fed MR containing probiotics showed an improved fatty acid profile for human diet.

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Full Paper
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animal , Volume 6 , Issue 2 , 03 January 2012 , pp. 339 - 345
Copyright
Copyright © The Animal Consortium 2011

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