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Meat quality of farmed red deer fed a balanced diet: effects of supplementation with copper bolus on different muscles

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 August 2018

M. P. Serrano
Affiliation:
Animal Science Techniques Applied to Wildlife Management Research Group, Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos, Albacete Section of CSIC-UCLM-JCCM, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (Campus Universitario sn), 02071 Albacete, Spain Sección de Recursos Cinegéticos y Ganaderos, Instituto de Desarrollo Regional of Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (Campus Universitario sn), 02071 Albacete, Spain Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnología Agroforestal y Genética, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Agrónomos y de Montes of Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (Campus Universitario sn), 02071 Albacete, Spain
A. Maggiolino
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari A. Moro, S.P.per Casamassimakm 3, 70010Valenzano, Bari, Italy
J. M. Lorenzo
Affiliation:
Centro Tecnológico de la Carne de Galicia, Parque Tecnológico de Galicia (Rúa Galicia 4), San Cibrán das Viñas, 32900 Ourense, Spain
P. De Palo
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari A. Moro, S.P.per Casamassimakm 3, 70010Valenzano, Bari, Italy
A. García
Affiliation:
Animal Science Techniques Applied to Wildlife Management Research Group, Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos, Albacete Section of CSIC-UCLM-JCCM, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (Campus Universitario sn), 02071 Albacete, Spain Sección de Recursos Cinegéticos y Ganaderos, Instituto de Desarrollo Regional of Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (Campus Universitario sn), 02071 Albacete, Spain Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnología Agroforestal y Genética, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Agrónomos y de Montes of Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (Campus Universitario sn), 02071 Albacete, Spain
T. Landete-Castillejos
Affiliation:
Animal Science Techniques Applied to Wildlife Management Research Group, Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos, Albacete Section of CSIC-UCLM-JCCM, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (Campus Universitario sn), 02071 Albacete, Spain Sección de Recursos Cinegéticos y Ganaderos, Instituto de Desarrollo Regional of Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (Campus Universitario sn), 02071 Albacete, Spain Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnología Agroforestal y Genética, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Agrónomos y de Montes of Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (Campus Universitario sn), 02071 Albacete, Spain
P. Gambín
Affiliation:
Animal Science Techniques Applied to Wildlife Management Research Group, Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos, Albacete Section of CSIC-UCLM-JCCM, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (Campus Universitario sn), 02071 Albacete, Spain Sección de Recursos Cinegéticos y Ganaderos, Instituto de Desarrollo Regional of Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (Campus Universitario sn), 02071 Albacete, Spain Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnología Agroforestal y Genética, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Agrónomos y de Montes of Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (Campus Universitario sn), 02071 Albacete, Spain
J. Cappelli
Affiliation:
Animal Science Techniques Applied to Wildlife Management Research Group, Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos, Albacete Section of CSIC-UCLM-JCCM, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (Campus Universitario sn), 02071 Albacete, Spain Sección de Recursos Cinegéticos y Ganaderos, Instituto de Desarrollo Regional of Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (Campus Universitario sn), 02071 Albacete, Spain Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnología Agroforestal y Genética, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Agrónomos y de Montes of Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (Campus Universitario sn), 02071 Albacete, Spain
R. Domínguez
Affiliation:
Centro Tecnológico de la Carne de Galicia, Parque Tecnológico de Galicia (Rúa Galicia 4), San Cibrán das Viñas, 32900 Ourense, Spain
F. J. Pérez-Barbería
Affiliation:
Animal Science Techniques Applied to Wildlife Management Research Group, Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos, Albacete Section of CSIC-UCLM-JCCM, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (Campus Universitario sn), 02071 Albacete, Spain Sección de Recursos Cinegéticos y Ganaderos, Instituto de Desarrollo Regional of Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (Campus Universitario sn), 02071 Albacete, Spain Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnología Agroforestal y Genética, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Agrónomos y de Montes of Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (Campus Universitario sn), 02071 Albacete, Spain
L. Gallego
Affiliation:
Animal Science Techniques Applied to Wildlife Management Research Group, Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos, Albacete Section of CSIC-UCLM-JCCM, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (Campus Universitario sn), 02071 Albacete, Spain Sección de Recursos Cinegéticos y Ganaderos, Instituto de Desarrollo Regional of Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (Campus Universitario sn), 02071 Albacete, Spain Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnología Agroforestal y Genética, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Agrónomos y de Montes of Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (Campus Universitario sn), 02071 Albacete, Spain
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Abstract

Supplementation with copper (Cu) improves deer antler characteristics, but it could modify meat quality and increase its Cu content to levels potentially harmful for humans. Here, we studied the effects of Cu bolus supplementation by means on quality and composition of sternocephalicus (ST) and rectus abdominis (RA) muscles (n=13 for each one) from yearling male red deer fed with a balanced diet. Each intraruminal bolus, containing 3.4 g of Cu, was administered orally in the treatment group to compare with the control group. Meat traits studied were pH at 24 h postmortem (pH24), colour, chemical composition, cholesterol content, fatty acid (FA) composition, amino acid (AA) profile and mineral content. In addition, the effect of Cu supplementation on mineral composition of liver and serum (at 0 and 90 days of treatment) was analysed. No interactions between Cu supplementation and muscle were observed for any trait. Supplementation with Cu increased the protein content of meat (P<0.01). However, Cu content of meat, liver and serum was not modified by supplementation. In fact, Cu content of meat (1.20 and 1.34 mg/kg for Cu supplemented and control deer, respectively) was much lower in both groups than 5 mg/kg of fresh weight allowed legally for food of animal origin. However, bolus of Cu tended to increase the meat content of zinc and significantly increased (P<0.05) the hepatic contents of sodium and lead. Muscles studied had different composition and characteristics. The RA muscle had significantly higher protein content (P<0.001), monounsaturated FA content (P<0.05) and essential/non-essential AA ratio (P<0.01) but lower pH24 (P<0.01) and polyunsaturated FA content (P=0.001) than the ST muscle. In addition, RA muscle had 14.4% less cholesterol (P=0.001) than ST muscle. Also, mineral profile differed between muscles with higher content of iron, significantly higher (P<0.001) content of zinc and lower content of calcium, magnesium and phosphorus (P<0.05) for ST muscle compared with RA. Therefore, supplementation with Cu modified deer meat characteristics, but it did not increase its concentration to toxic levels, making it a safe practice from this perspective. Despite the lower content of polyunsaturated FA, quality was better for RA than for ST muscle based on its higher content of protein with more essential/non-essential AA ratio and lower pH24 and cholesterol content.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© The Animal Consortium 2018 

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