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Gene expression profile in white alpaca (Vicugna pacos) skin

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2011

R. Fan
Affiliation:
College of Animal Science and Technology, Shanxi Agricultural University, Taigu 030801, People's Republic of China
Y. Dong
Affiliation:
College of Animal Science and Technology, Shanxi Agricultural University, Taigu 030801, People's Republic of China
J. Cao
Affiliation:
College of Animal Science and Technology, Shanxi Agricultural University, Taigu 030801, People's Republic of China
R. Bai
Affiliation:
College of Animal Science and Technology, Shanxi Agricultural University, Taigu 030801, People's Republic of China
Z. Zhu
Affiliation:
College of Animal Science and Technology, Shanxi Agricultural University, Taigu 030801, People's Republic of China
P. Li
Affiliation:
College of Animal Science and Technology, Shanxi Agricultural University, Taigu 030801, People's Republic of China
J. Zhang
Affiliation:
College of Animal Science and Technology, Shanxi Agricultural University, Taigu 030801, People's Republic of China
X. He
Affiliation:
College of Animal Science and Technology, Shanxi Agricultural University, Taigu 030801, People's Republic of China
L. Lü
Affiliation:
College of Animal Science and Technology, Shanxi Agricultural University, Taigu 030801, People's Republic of China
J. Yao
Affiliation:
Division of Animal and Nutritional Sciences, Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology and Genomics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA
M. Mondal
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Mammalian Reproductive Biology and Genomics, Departments of Animal Science and Physiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
G. W. Smith
Affiliation:
College of Animal Science and Technology, Shanxi Agricultural University, Taigu 030801, People's Republic of China Laboratory of Mammalian Reproductive Biology and Genomics, Departments of Animal Science and Physiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
C. Dong
Affiliation:
College of Animal Science and Technology, Shanxi Agricultural University, Taigu 030801, People's Republic of China
Corresponding
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Abstract

A cDNA library from white alpaca (Vicugna pacos) skin was constructed using SMART technology to investigate the global gene expression profile in alpaca skin and identify genes associated with physiology of alpaca skin and pigmentation. A total of 5359 high-quality EST (expressed sequence tag) sequences were generated by sequencing random cDNA clones from the library. Clustering analysis of sequences revealed a total of 3504 unique sequences including 739 contigs (assembled from 2594 ESTs) and 2765 singletons. BLAST analysis against GenBank nr database resulted in 1287 significant hits (E-value < 10−10), of which 863 were annotated through gene ontology analysis. Transcripts for genes related to fleece quality, growth and coat color (e.g. collagen types I and III, troponin C2 and secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine) were abundantly present in the library. Other genes, such as keratin family genes known to be involved in melanosome protein production, were also identified in the library. Members (KRT10, 14 and 15) of this gene family are evolutionarily conserved as revealed by a cross-species comparative analysis. This collection of ESTs provides a valuable resource for future research to understand the network of gene expression linked to physiology of alpaca skin and development of pigmentation.

Type
Full Paper
Information
animal , Volume 5 , Issue 8 , August 2011 , pp. 1157 - 1161
Copyright
Copyright © The Animal Consortium 2011

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