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Effect of feed consumption levels on growth performance and carcass composition during the force-feeding period in foie gras production of male Mule ducks

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 March 2016

Z. G. Wen
Affiliation:
Institute of Animal Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100193, China Feed Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100081, China
Y. Jiang
Affiliation:
Institute of Animal Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100193, China College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193, China
J. Tang
Affiliation:
Institute of Animal Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100193, China College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193, China
M. Xie
Affiliation:
Institute of Animal Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100193, China
P. L. Yang
Affiliation:
Feed Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100081, China
S. S. Hou*
Affiliation:
Institute of Animal Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100193, China
*
E-mail: houss@263.net
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Abstract

In order to avoid excess feed consumption during the force-feeding period in foie gras production, a dose-response experiment with seven feed consumption levels (450, 540, 630, 720, 810, 900, 990 g/day per bird) was conducted to evaluate the effects of feed consumption levels on growth performance and carcass composition of male Mule ducks from 91 to 102 days of age. One-day-old Mule ducklings (sterile and artificial hybrid of male Albatre Muscovy duck and female Pekin duck were fed a two-phase commercial diets for ad libitum intake from hatching to 91 days of age, followed by graded feeding levels of a corn diet by force-feeding from 91 to 102 days of age. Fifty-six 91-day-old male Mule ducks with similar BW were randomly assigned to seven treatments, with eight birds per treatment. Birds were housed in individual pens. At 102 days of age, final BW was measured and BW gain and feed conversion ratio of ducks from each treatment were calculated from day 91 to 102, and then all ducks were slaughtered to evaluate the yields of skin with subcutaneous fat, abdominal fat, breast meat (including pectoralis major and pectoralis minor), leg meat (including thigh and drum stick), and liver. Significant differences in BW gain, total liver weight and liver relative weight were observed among the treatments (P<0.001). According to the broken-line regression analysis, the optimal feed consumption levels of male Mule ducks from 91 to 102 days of age for maximum BW gain, total liver weight and liver relative weight were 217, 227 and 216 g feed/kg BW0.75·per day, respectively.

Type
Research Article
Information
animal , Volume 10 , Issue 9 , September 2016 , pp. 1417 - 1422
Copyright
© The Animal Consortium 2016 

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Footnotes

a

These two authors contributed equally to this work.

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