Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-568f69f84b-8fhp6 Total loading time: 0.202 Render date: 2021-09-20T12:26:45.706Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Rumen degradation of straw 3. Botanical fractions of two rice straw varieties and effects of ammonia treatment

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 September 2010

T. K. Walli
Affiliation:
Rowett Research Institute, Bucksburn, Aberdeen AB2 9SB
E. R. Ørskov
Affiliation:
Rowett Research Institute, Bucksburn, Aberdeen AB2 9SB
P. K. Bhargava
Affiliation:
Rowett Research Institute, Bucksburn, Aberdeen AB2 9SB
Get access

Abstract

Two varieties of rice straw, long variety — no. 370 Basmati traditional (L) and short variety — no. PR106 hybrid (S) were separated into botanical fractions giving the proportion of leaf plus leaf sheath, internode, node and chaff (g/kg dry matter) as 633, 247, 83 and 37 for L and 680, 156, 76 and 88 for S, respectively. Samples of whole plants, leaves plus leaf sheaths and internodes were subjected to ammonia treatment. The chemical composition and the rumen degradability of dry matter and organic matter determined by the nylon bag technique were ascertained for treated and untreated samples of whole plants and botanical fractions of plants from both varieties. The ash and silica content were higher in leaf plus leaf sheath, 211 and 102 g/kg for the L and 190 and 67 g/kg for the S, than in internodes, 160 and 29 g/kg for L and 184 and 29 g/kg S, respectively.

The potential degradability (a + b) value from the formula p = a + b(−e−ct) for dry-matter loss (DML), organic-matter loss (OML) and degradability of organic matter in dry matter (DOMD) were significantly higher for the S being 622, 659 and 544 g/kg, than for the L being 561, 586 and 500 g/kg, respectively (P < 0·01). The degradation rate too was significantly higher for the S than for the L for DML, OML and DOMD (P < 0·01). The ammonia treatment significantly improved the potential degradability for DML, OML and DOMD for both the varieties and their fractions (P < 0·01).

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Society of Animal Science 1988

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Association of Official Analytical Chimists. 1975. Official Methods of Analysis of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists. 12th ed. Association of Official Analytical Chemists, Washington DC.Google Scholar
Bainton, S. J., Plumb, V. E. and Capper, B. S. 1987. Botanical composition, chemical analysis and cellulase solubility of rice straw from different varieties. Animal Production 44: 481 (Abstr.).Google Scholar
Cheva-Isarakul, B. and Chhva-Isarakul, B. 1985. Variation in the nutritive value of rice straw in northern Thailand. In The Utilization of Fibrous Agricultural Residues as Animal Feeds (ed. Doyle, P. T.), pp. 6970. School of Agricultural Forestry, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria.Google Scholar
Davidson, J., Mathieson, J. and Boyne, A. W. 1970. The use of automation in determining nitrogen by the Kjeldahl method, with final calculation by computer. The Analyst, London 95: 181193.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Doyle, P. T., Devendra, C. and Pearce, G. R. 1986. In Rice Straw as a Feed for Ruminants. International Development Programme of Australian Universities and Colleges Limited (IDP), Canberra.Google Scholar
Hartley, R. D., Deschard, G., Keene, A. S. and Mason, V. C. 1984. Changes in the chemical constitution of cereal straw and poor quality hay during upgrading. In Improvements in the Nutritive Value of Crops and By-products by Chemical or Biological Treatments. Proceedings of 2nd Seminar on the Up-grading of Crops and By-products, Hurley, pp. 1114. Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, London.Google Scholar
Kernan, J. A., Crowle, W. L., Spurr, D. T. and Coxworth, E. C. 1979. Straw quality of cereal cultivars before and after treatment with anhydrous ammonia. Canadian Journal of Animal Science 59: 511517.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mehrez, A. Z. and Ørskov, E. R. 1977. A study of the artificial fibre bag technique for determining the digestibility of feeds in the rumen. Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge 88: 645650.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ørskov, E. R. and McDonald, I. 1979. The estimation of protein degradability in the rumen from incubation measurements weighted according to rate of passage. Journal of Agriculture Science, Cambridge 92: 499503.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pearce, G. R. 1984. Factors contributing to variation in the nutritive value of fibrous agricultural residues. In The Utilization of Fibrous Agricultural Residues as Animal Feeds (ed. Doyle, P. T.), pp. 117123. School of Agricultural Forestry, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria.Google Scholar
Sannasgala, K. and Jayasuriya, M. C. N. 1984. Effects of physiological and morphological characteristics on the chemical composition and in vitro digestibility of different varieties of rice straw. In The Utilization of Fibrous Agricultural Residues as Animal Feeds (ed. Doyle, P. T.), pp. 4753. School of Agricultural Forestry, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria.Google Scholar
Sannasgala, K. and Jayasuriya, M. C. N. 1986. The effect of variety and cultivation season on the chemical composition and in vitro organic matter digestibility of rice straw. Agricultural Wastes 18: 8391.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Snedecor, G. W. and Cochran, W. G. 1976. Statistical Methods. 7th ed. Iowa State University Press, Ames, la.Google Scholar
Van Soest, P. J. 1963. Use of detergents in the analysis of fibrous feeds. II. A rapid method for the determination of fibre and lignin. Journal of the Association of Official Agricultural Chemists 46: 829835.Google Scholar
Winugroho, M. 1981. Studies of the utilization of cereal straw. M. Agr. Sc. Thesis, University of Melbourne, Australia.Google Scholar
22
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Rumen degradation of straw 3. Botanical fractions of two rice straw varieties and effects of ammonia treatment
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Rumen degradation of straw 3. Botanical fractions of two rice straw varieties and effects of ammonia treatment
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Rumen degradation of straw 3. Botanical fractions of two rice straw varieties and effects of ammonia treatment
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *