Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-qdp55 Total loading time: 0.295 Render date: 2021-12-06T21:57:45.630Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

The relationship in ewes between voluntary food intake during pregnancy and forage intake during lactation and after weaning

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 September 2010

Janet Z. Foot
Affiliation:
Hill Farming Research Organisation, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian, EH26 OPY
A. J. F. Russel
Affiliation:
Hill Farming Research Organisation, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian, EH26 OPY
Get access

Abstract

(1) Voluntary intake of forage was measured in 31 Scottish Blackface ewes for the last 14 weeks of pregnancy, throughout lactation, and 15 weeks subsequently. During pregnancy 15 ewes were given hay and 16 dried grass (apparent dry-matter digestibilities in vitro were 51 and 69·6% respectively). All ewes were given the same dried grass during lactation and after weaning (digestibilities 75 and 73% respectively). Body fat was estimated from tritiated water space.

(2) Pregnant ewes consumed twice as much digestible dry matter from dried grass (1028 g) as from hay (502 g). Intakes of ewes with twin and single foetuses were similar.

(3) During lactation the mean daily intakes of dried grass were 2278, 2610,2612 and 2722 g dry matter respectively, for ewes that had been given dried grass in pregnancy and had single and twin lambs, and for those that had been given hay and had singles and twins. Differences between dried grass and hay were consistently significant (P < 0·01).

(4) After weaning the intakes declined rapidly but their ranking remained similar.

(5) Lamb birth weights were affected by nutrition during pregnancy, lamb growth rates within twins or singles were not influenced by maternal nutrition during pregnancy or lactation. Differences in ewe intakes during lactation were reflected in ewe body-weight changes.

(6) For all ewes, up to 64% of the variation in intake during lactation could be related to factors prevailing before and at lambing (pregnancy diet, ewe weight and fat content) and during lactation (lamb gain and ewe weight change).

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Society of Animal Science 1979

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Arnold, G. W. 1975. Herbage intake and grazing behaviour in ewes of four breeds at different physiological states. Aust. J. agric. Res. 26: 10171024.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Arnold, G. W. and Dudzinski, M. L. 1967. Studies on the diet of the grazing animal. II. The effect of physiological status in ewes and pasture availability on herbage intake. Aust. J. agric. Res. 18: 349359.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bines, J. A., Suzuki, S. and Balch, C. C. 1969. The quantitative significance of long-term regulation of food intake in the cow. Br. J. Nutr. 23: 695704.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Blaxter, K. L. 1957. The effects of defective nutrition during pregnancy in farm livestock. Proc. Nutr. Soc. 16: 5258.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cooper, M. McG. 1966. In-wintering of sheep. OutI. Agric. 5: 8084.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Foot, J. Z. 1969. Voluntary food intake and body composition in pregnant ewes. Ph.D. Thesis, Fac. Science, Univ. Aberdeen.Google Scholar
Foot, J. Z. and Greenhalgh, J. F. D. 1970. A note on the relation between weights of alimentary tract contents, body fat and the uterus in Blackface ewes. Anim. Prod. 12: 669671.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Foot, J. Z. and Russel, A. J. F. 1978. Pattern of intake of three roughage diets by non-pregnant, non-lactating Scottish Blackface ewes over a long period and the effects of previous nutritional history on current intake. Anim. Prod. 26: 202215.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Forbes, J. M. 1968. The physical relationships of the abdominal organs in the pregnant ewe. J. agric. Sci., Camb. 70: 171177.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Forbes, J. M. 1970a. The voluntary food intake of pregnant and lactating ruminants: A review. Br. vet. J. 126: 111.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Forbes, J. M. 1970b. Voluntary intake of pregnant ewes. J. Anim. Sci. 31: 12221227.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Forbes, J. M. 1977. Interrelationships between physical and metabolic control of voluntary food intake in fattening, pregnant and lactating mature ewes: A model. Anim. Prod. 24: 91101.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fraser, A. H. H., Godden, W., Snook, L. C. and Thomson, W. 1939. Ketonaemia in pregnant ewes and its possible relation to pregnancy diseases. J. Physiol, Land. 97: 120127.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gordon, J. G. and Tribe, D. E. 1951. The self-selection of diet by pregnant ewes. J. agric. Sci., Camb. 41: 187190.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hadjipieris, G. and Holmes, W. 1966. Studies on feed intake and feed utilisation by sheep. I. The voluntary feed intake of dry, pregnant and lactating ewes. J. agric. Sci., Camb. 66: 217223.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heaney, D. P. and Lodge, G. A. 1975. Body composition and energy metabolism during late pregnancy in the ad libitum-fed ewe. Can. J. Anim. Sci. 55: 545555.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Marquardt, J. P., Horst, R. L. and Jorgensen, N. A. 1977. Effect of parity on dry matter intake at parturition in dairy cattle. J. Dairy Sci. 60: 929934.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Owen, J. B. 1976. Sheep Production. Baillière Tindall, London.Google Scholar
Peart, J. N. 1967. The effect of different levels of nutrition during late pregnancy on the subsequent milk production of Blackface ewes and on the growth of their lambs. J. agric. Sci., Camb. 68: 365371.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Peart, J. N. 1970. The influence of live weight and body condition on the subsequent milk production of Blackface ewes following a period of undernourishment in early lactation. J. agric. Sci., Camb. 75: 459469.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reid, R. L. 1968. The physio-pathology of undernourishment in pregnant sheep with particular reference to pregnancy toxaemia. Adv. vet. Sci. 12: 163238.Google Scholar
Reid, R. L. and Hinks, N. T. 1962. Studies on the carbohydrate metabolism of sheep. XVII. Feed requirements and voluntary feed intake in late pregnancy, with particular reference to prevention of hypoglycaemia and hyperketonaemia. Aust. J. agric. Res. 13: 10921111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sheehan, L. and Lawlor, M. J. 1971. Feeding the pregnant ewe. Farm and Food Res. 2: 139140.Google Scholar
Schinckel, P. G. 1960. Variation in feed intake as a cause of variation in wool production n i grazing sheep. Aust. J. agric. Res. 11: 585594.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Short, B. F. 1955. Developmental modification of fleece structure by adverse maternal nutrition. Aust. J. agric. Res. 6: 863872.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tissier, M., Thereez, M. and Molenat, G. 1975. [Variation in the voluntary feed intake of ewes during late pregnancy and early lactation: examples of their performance. I. Study of two hay diets of different quality.] Annls Zootech. 24: 711727.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tissier, M., Thériez, M. and MoléNat, G. 1977. [Variation in the voluntary feed intake of ewes during late pregnancy and early lactation: examples of their performance. II. Maize silage and hay offered ad libitum.] Annls Zootech. 26: 149166.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Treacher, T. T. 1970. Effects of nutrition in late pregnancy on subsequent milk production i n ewes. Anim. Prod. 12: 2336.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vera, R. R., Morris, J. G. and Koong, Ling-Jung. 1977. A quantitative model of energy intake and partition in grazing sheep in various physiological states. Anim. Prod. 25: 133153.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
20
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The relationship in ewes between voluntary food intake during pregnancy and forage intake during lactation and after weaning
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The relationship in ewes between voluntary food intake during pregnancy and forage intake during lactation and after weaning
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The relationship in ewes between voluntary food intake during pregnancy and forage intake during lactation and after weaning
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *