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A note on the fracture of porcine scapulae during their withdrawal from the carcass

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 September 2010

T. R. Thomas
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Teesside Polytechnic, Middlesbrough, Cleveland TS1 3BA
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Abstract

In the processing of pig carcasses after slaughter the scapulae are removed mechanically. It is economically important to minimize the proportion of fractures (2 to 4%) that occur during this operation. The incidence of fractures in several hundred scapulae was investigated with a strain testing machine modified to simulate production-line techniques. The proportion of fractures occurring on the line was consistent with the relationship between the standard force employed and the standard deviation of the normal variation of the fracture load about its mean. In an attempt to raise the mean fracture load by reducing the maximum contact stress, the contact radius of the withdrawing tool was increased; this did not significantly change the mean fracture load but significantly decreased its variation.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Society of Animal Science 1978

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References

Tmoshenko, S. and Goodier, J. N. 1969. Theory of Elasticity. 3rd ed. McGraw-Hill, New York.Google Scholar
Yamada, H. 1970. Strength of Biological Materials. Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, Md.Google Scholar

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