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A note on the effect of body condition on the voluntary intake of dried grass wafers by Scottish Blackface ewes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 September 2010

Janet Z. Foot
Affiliation:
Hill Farming Research Organisation, 29 Lauder Road, Edinburgh EH9 2JQ
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Summary

The fatness of 34 non-pregnant Scottish Blackface ewes was estimated subjectively by lumbar palpation. The sheep were separated into groups of ‘fat’ (more than 27 % body fat) and ‘thin’ animals (less than 20% body fat). The voluntary intake of dried grass by these sheep was measured over a 6-week period.

The mean daily dry-matter intake by the thin sheep was 1·9 kg or 106 g/kg W0·73 and by the fat sheep was 1·4 kg or 68 g/kg W0·73.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Society of Animal Science 1972

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References

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